[syllabus.03] Iteration & reduction

This was the original list:

  1. February: P5.JS
  2. March: Swift
  3. April: Origami
  4. May: AfterEffects
  5. June: Unity
  6. July: RoR / build an API
  7. August: Cellphone / Arduino / Hardware hacking
  8. September: Openframe / Raspberry Pi
  9. October: Urban farming
  10. November: Python / Data mining
  11. December: Pure data

This is how that list can be if it's categorized in disciplines:

Design

  • Origami
  • Unity
  • AfterEffects

Programming

  • P5JS
  • RoR / build an API
  • Swift
  • Python / Data mining

Hardware

  • Cellphone / Arduino / Hardware hacking
  • Openframe / Raspberry Pi

Other

  • Urban farming
  • Pure data

 

I also figured out that I can reduce by a half the topics that I want to approach:

  • Origami
  • P5JS, PaperJS
  • RoR / build an API
  • Python / Data mining
  • Cellphone / Arduino / Hardware hacking
  • Openframe / Raspberry Pi
 

Projects

  • Interfaces. Origami, After Effects
  • Build a web app that collects information that I like. APIs, servers, product.
  • Tracking MX government numbers. Python, RaspberryPi, server
  • Cellphone. Arduino, hardware hacking
  • Openframe. Raspberry Pi, servers, hardware hacking, industrial design.

Science disciplines

Something that would be more difficult to even try to learn but will actually be substantial for everything else will be to learn and practice disciplines: physics, mathematics, calculus. But I guess it will requiere a lot of time and I can lear some of those concepts by intersecting it with other branches of knowledge. Like learn physics by making video games and learning math by making some hardware hacking.

Nevertheless, I'm gonna try to study some core topics of physics and math.

Learning to draw (again) & controllers

Two other things that I'm also interested in learning/working are:

  • Alternative controllers. I want to design and potentially build a couple of alternative controllers. I'm interested in alternative and kinetic I/Os. Things like a rounded controller, soft controllers, motion controllers, 3D controllers, sound controllers, light controllers, etc.
  • Learning to draw based on imitating artists and illustrators I really admire. The exercise will consist of actually copying and studying drawings by my favorite drawers. No creativity needed.

[note] Formal vs Informal

One determining thought before distributing my learning hours will be the formal vs the informal. How much time do I spend reading about computing, technology, arts and design systems in general, and how much do I spend tackling a specific skill, like "using Python to data mining Mexican government's APIs".

I need to come up with something.

[syllabus.02] Tracing a calendar

From my last post, I extracted these:

Criteria

  • I can choose 12 topics/projects and execute 1 per month.
  • I can choose 52 exercises and try to execute one per week, more on a sprint mode.
  • I can choose 4 topics and spend 3 months on each one.
  • The last option is to choose 3 topics and spend 4 months on each one.

Topics

  • P5.JS
  • Two.JS
  • Swift
  • Pure Data
  • After Effects
  • Origami
  • Unity
  • Data mining [see Python]
  • Python [see Data mining]
  • Blender
  • Hardware hacking (learn to use the Raspberry Pi, Arduino or any other HH board)
  • Urban farming
  • RoR / [build an] APIs
  • Openframe
  • Cellphone
  • Raspberry Pi / [how to set up a] server
  • Art / installation [see RPi]

Notes & after thoughts:

  • The categorization between topics and projects doesn't help that much.
  • Choosing 3 topics to spend 4 months on each topic sounds like the least exciting discipline.
  • Learning one thing per week is not going to make me an expert on any thing. Nevertheless, I don't want to be an expert, but yet, I want to accomplish some things.
  • Even though the constraint of "time" is not the best metric to accomplish depth on a topic or discipline, it does help to boost the energy into accomplishing something.

If I distribute the topics through out a year for every month, it would just encompass the next projects:

  1. February: P5.JS
  2. March: Swift
  3. April: Origami
  4. May: AfterEffects
  5. June: Unity
  6. July: RoR / build an API
  7. August: Cellphone / Arduino / Hardware hacking
  8. September: Openframe / Raspberry Pi
  9. October: Urban farming
  10. November: Python / Data mining
  11. December: Pure data

If I just pick 4 topics for the year, it would probably look like this:

  1. Q1: Programming: P5JS, Python / Data mining
  2. Q2: After Effects, Origami, design prototyping
  3. Q3: Urban Farming
  4. Q5: Hardware hacking, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Cellphone, Openframe

Some problems with all these topics is that I actually don't have that much time through out the year to learn so many things. So the dilema is: should I learn a little bit of a lot of things or should I try to learn less (let's say, just one thing, but better) through the year? One problem with trying to learn just one thing is that, invariably, I'm going to find a lot of obstacles on any selected topic and it's quite probable that it's not gonna have to be with me, but with some external factor (the chosen language can't run on my computer, the latest update broke my project, it's not good timing to practice urban farming).

[syllabus.00] Things I want to learn

Here's a [master] list of the topics I'm interested in learning [2017]:

  • P5.JS
  • Two.JS
  • Swift
  • Pure Data
  • After Effects
  • Origami
  • Unity
  • Data mining [see Python]
  • Python [see Data mining]
  • Blender
  • Hardware hacking (it can be from learning how to use an Arduino to making a specific hardware hacking project)
  • Urban farming
  • RoR / [build an] APIs
  • Openframe
  • Cellphone
  • Raspberry Pi / [how to set up a] server

This is an un-going list that will contract and expand depending on my interests.